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Men-at-Arms 434 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Gerry Embleton About this book The German Police were an essential arm of the Nazi regime; as soon as Hitler achieved power the previous decentralized provincial system was unified into a single state apparatus, integrated at the command levels with the SS. While it may have been centrally controlled, it was still separated into a bewildering range of different departments and functions, many with their own uniform distinctions. This book offers a concise introduction to the organization, responsibilities, uniforms and insignia of the various branches of this machinery of repression, from Police generals to rural constables, transport policemen and factory watchmen.
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Men-at-Arms 420 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book In 1944–45 the Waffen-SS formed many nominal 'divisions' from a motley range of sources, whose battlefield value was as varied as their backgrounds. The best were built around existing Western European volunteer regiments; some, raised from Central Europeans and Russians, were strong in numbers but weak in morale; some were of negligible size, scraped together from remnants and trainees; and some were sinister 'anti-partisan' gangs, assembled from the military dregs of the Eastern Front. Illustrated with rare photographs from private collections and meticulous colour artwork, this final title in our sequence details their organisation, uniforms and insignia, and summarises their battle records.
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Men-at-Arms 415 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book The Waffen-SS grew from a handful of obscure infantry battalions in 1939, to a force of more than 30 divisions by the end of World War II, including units of every type and every level of battlefield value. The mid-war divisions covered in this third title represent that range, from some of the most effective German and Western European volunteer formations – e.g. the 12. SS-Pz Div 'Hitlerjugend', and the Scandinavians and Dutchmen of the 11. 'Nordland' and 23. 'Nederland' divisions – to the Bosnian Muslims of the anti-partisan 13. 'Handschar' Division. Illustrated with rare photographs from private collections and meticulous colour artwork, the text details their organization, uniforms and insignia, and summarizes their battle records.
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Men-at-Arms 404 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book The military branch of the Nazi SS security organisation grew by the end of World War II from a handful of poorly regarded infantry battalions in 1939, into a force of more than 30 divisions including units of every type. Their battlefield reputation varied widely, from the premier armoured divisions which formed Germany's utterly reliable spearheads on both main fronts, to low quality 'anti-partisan' units. The divisions covered in this second of four titles include the first mountain and cavalry units, and two of the remarkable new Panzer divisions raised in the great 1943 expansion. Illustrated with rare photographs from private collections, the text details their organisation, uniforms and insignia, and summarises their battle record.
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Men-at-Arms 401 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book Despite being disdained by the German Army’s professional officer corps, the military branch of the Nazi SS security organisation grew from an initial strength of only a handful of battalions at the outbreak of war in 1939 to hundreds of thousands of troops in dozens of divisions. The battlefield reputation of the premier armoured and mechanised divisions would become second to none; lavishly equipped and regarded as utterly reliable, they were thrown into many desperate battles on both Western and Eastern fronts, often achieving remarkable results. Illustrated with rare photographs, this first of four Men-at-Arms titles details the organisation, uniforms and insignia of the Waffen-SS.
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Men-at-Arms 393 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Ramiro Bujeiro About this book Under the Nazi regime, Hitler's conservative views on the place of housewives and mothers in society limited German women to a much less active role in the war than their British and Allied counterparts. Nevertheless, the demands of a prolonged war did see German women in a range of uniforms as auxiliaries with the Army, Navy, Air Force and SS, particularly in the signals and air defence services. This unique book explains and illustrates these organisations and their uniforms and insignia, as well as Red Cross nurses, and auxiliaries of the Labour Corps, Customs Service, National Socialist Women's Organisation, and League of German Maidens (Hitler Youth).
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Men-at-Arms 385 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book Each of Germany's World War II armed services could claim one unit which earned a unique combat reputation, and which consequently was enlarged and developed far beyond the size originally planned. Hermann Göring, commander-in-chief of the air force, was determined that his Luftwaffe should share the glory of Germany's land conquests, and gave his name to a regimental combat group of infantry and Flak artillery. This élite unit was steadily enlarged into a brigade, then an armoured division, and finally into a two-division corps, fighting with distinction in Tunisia, Sicily, Italy, and on the Russian Front. This concise history is illustrated with rare personal photographs and eight colour plates, detailing the very varied uniforms and special insignia of this crack formation.
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Men-at-Arms 377 Author: Robert F Stedman Illustrator: Mike Chappell About this book The Luftwaffe, honed in the Spanish Civil War, played a vital part in Germany's 'Blitzkrieg' victories in 1939-41. Badly overstretched by war on three fronts in 1942-44, it was crippled by an incompetent commander-in-chief, the losses among experienced aircrew, and shortage of fuel. In 1944-45 it faced a final battle of attrition in skies ruled by the Allies as the Eastern and Western pincers closed on the Reich; but until the very end the dwindling band of veteran pilots - among them the greatest 'aces' the world has ever known - presented a potent threat. This fact-packed review of Luftwaffe uniforms and flying kit is illustrated with rare personal photos, insignia charts, and two dozen meticulously detailed colour figures.
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Men-at-Arms 380 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Ramiro Bujeiro About this book In World War II a number of German Army units and divisions were classed as élites, and were distinguished by special insignia of various kinds. For some this status was simply a matter of lineage - e.g. the Infantry Regiment 'List', which traced its identity to the Bavarian unit with which Hitler had served in World War I. Some, like the 'Grossdeutschland' and Panzer-Lehr divisions, were raised from particularly high grade personnel. Other titles honoured extraordinary battlefield exploits or heroic sacrifice, like the 'Brandenburg' and 'Hoch und Deutschmeister' divisions. This fact-packed introduction to these famous units is illustrated with rare photographs and detailed colour plates.
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Men-at-Arms 365 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Darko Pavlovic About this book The remarkable war effort of the German armed forces on three fronts between 1939 and 1945 was recognised by a wider range of insignia than seen in the Allied armies. While the Wehrmacht displayed fewer unit insignia than the Allies, a glance at a German soldier's tunic could reveal much more about his actual combat experience. In this book an experienced researcher explains and illustrates the Battle and Assault Badges of the Army, Waffen-SS and Luftwaffe ground troops; the sleeve shields and cuffbands issued to mark service in particular campaigns; wound badges, commemorative medals, and other types of insignia.
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Men-at-Arms 336 Author: Nigel Thomas Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book This book covers the high command, the developments in unit organisation, the campaigns and the uniforms and equipment of the German Army in the last two years of the war in North-West Europe and Italy. Despite the huge pressure of fighting on three fronts, ever-worsening shortages of manpower and equipment, and Allied command of the skies, Germany's decimated divisions fought on with impressive skill and determination. This period also saw a fascinating mixture of obsolescent, newly designed, and field-made combat clothing which gave the German soldier a radically different appearance from his predecessor of just five years before.
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Men-at-Arms 330 Author: Nigel Thomas Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book In early 1943 the annihilation of the 6th Army at Stalingrad marked the irreversible turning-point of the war in the East. Despite occasional local successes gained in the face of great odds – testimony to the Wehrmacht’s extraordinary resilience – from now on Germany was on the defensive. Despite Hitler’s damaging interference the quality of German field leadership, and of new weapons, remained high; but each new Soviet offensive pushed the front line closer to – and finally, across – the borders of the Reich. In this fourth title of their sequence author and artist describe and illustrate the developments in unit organization, uniforms and equipment during 1943–45, including information on European and Eastern volunteer units; text and illustrations are supported by detailed tables.
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Men-at-Arms 326 Author: Nigel Thomas Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book Operation Barbarossa, the attack on the Soviet Union, commenced on 22 June 1941. It became the biggest conflict in military history, with some three million German troops and about 900,000 allies facing almost 4.7 million Soviet troops. The effects would colour postwar European history for the next 50 years. This title examines the history of the conflict, and the organisation, uniforms and insignia of the German Army on the Eastern Front from 1941-43. The book contains numerous illustrations and photographs throughout, incuding eight fine full-page colour plates by Stephen Andrew
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Men-at-Arms 316 Author: Nigel Thomas Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book Hitler first considered an invasion of Great Britain in autumn 1940, then scheduled Operation Barbarossa, the conquest of the European part of the Soviet Union, for May 1941. Anxious to emulate Hitler's successes, the Italian dictator Mussolini embarked upon unnecessary military adventures in North Africa and the Balkans, which forced Hitler's intervention, diverting and depleting precious German resources, and a six-week postponement of Barbarossa. In this second of four volumes [Men-at-Arms 311, 316, 326 & 330] on the German Army of the Second World War, Nigel Thomas examines the uniforms and insignia of the forces involved in North Africa and the Balkans.
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Men-at-Arms 311 Author: Nigel Thomas Illustrator: Stephen Andrew About this book On 1 September 1939, when Germany attacked Poland, the Wehrmacht numbered 3,180,000 men. It eventually expanded to 9,500,000, and on 8-9 May 1945, the date of its unconditional surrender on the Western and Eastern Fronts, it still numbered 7,800,000. The Blitzkrieg period, from 1 September 1939 to 25 June 1940, was 10 months of almost total triumph for the Wehrmacht, as it defeated every country, except Great Britain, that took the field against it. In this first of five volumes examining the German Army of World War Two, Nigel Thomas examines the uniforms and insignia of Hitler's Blitzkrieg forces, including an overview of the Blitzkrieg campaign itself.
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Men-at-Arms 278 Author: Brian L Davis Illustrator: Malcolm McGregor About this book In his book Mein Kampf Adolf Hitler claims that he made the decision to use the swastika as the emblem for his fledgling movement. He was responsible for the shape the swastika finally took, and for the choice of colours used, which set the pattern for all subsequent flags. In this third of a series of texts [MAA 270 & MAA 274], Brian L. Davis investigates the flags of the Third Reich party and police units, in a text complemented by numerous contemporary photographs, and eight full page colour plates by Malcolm McGregor.
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Men-at-Arms 274 Author: Brian L Davis Illustrator: Malcolm McGregor About this book An essential part of German propaganda was the raising of non-German volunteer contingents, variously named as 'Legions' and 'Free Corps'. These units were from their outset mere token forces, comparatively insignificant in numbers and maintained chiefly for their propaganda value. However, as the tide of battle turned relentlessly against the Germans, the appeal for volunteers became ever more desperate. In this second of three volumes examining the flags of the Third Reich [see Men-at-Arms 270 and 278] Brian L. Davis examines the flags of the Waffen-SS: those of Walloon, Flanders, Norway, Finland, Danzig, Denmark, Estonia, Latvia, Croatia, France, Spain and India.
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Men-at-Arms 270 Author: Brian L Davis Illustrator: Malcolm McGregor About this book The decision to reintroduce unit Colours for the armed forces of the new Wehrmacht involved many problems. No unit flags and standards had been produced since before 1914. Paul Casberg, the well-known master painter and illustrator, was commissioned to design the new Army Colours, a commission which, in his own words, he considered to be 'the most beautiful order I have ever received'. Packed with numerous contemporary photographs, and eight full page colour plates by Malcolm McGregor, Brian L. Davis's text examines the flags of the Wehrmacht, in this first of three volumes concerning flags of the Third Reich.
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Men-at-Arms 266 Author: Robin Lumsden Illustrator: Paul Hannon About this book The SS originated as Hitler's personal bodyguard and following his rise to power in 1933 the organisation divided into two: the Waffen-SS, which comprised the military wing, and the Allgemeine-SS, whose role was to support the police in maintaining order. The Allgemeine-SS had a wide-ranging effect on all aspects of life in Nazi Germany, from enforcing Hitler’s racial policies through to the running of over 500 factories in Germany and occupied Europe. While the more visible armed SS combat units naturally received all the publicity, especially during the war, it was the rather faceless Allgemeine-SS which wielded the real power.
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Men-at-Arms 254 Author: Nigel Thomas Illustrator: Simon McCouaig About this book Though the 'Wehrmachtsgefolge' (Armed Forces Auxiliaries) were generally inferior to their armed forces equivalents, their contribution to the German war-effort was far from negligible. Auxiliaries including the NSKK, Transportkorps Speer, Reichsarbeitsdienst and Organization Todt supported the Wehrmacht in their duties. In 1944, the strength of these organizations peaked at 3,800,000-40% of the size of the armed forces. As they became increasingly aware of their importance, the Auxiliaries introduced uniform and insignia modifications which made them virtually indistinguishable from their comrades in the armed forces. This book examines the organization, uniforms and history of the various Wehrmacht auxiliary forces.
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Men-at-Arms 234 Author: Gordon L. Rottman Illustrator: Ronald Volstad About this book The field equipment of the German Army in World War II was closely related to that used throughout World War I and earlier, yet it was of relatively light weight, ruggedly constructed, well designed, functional, and generally of a high quality, though this deteriorated in the later war years. A high degree of design standardisation was maintained in most categories of equipment, though materials and their colours often varied widely. There were also many different specialisations for the various arms of service as well as theatres of combat, such as the Afrikakorps in the Western Desert. This title investigates all manner of German combat equipments throughout World War II, from belt buckles to magazine pouches.
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Men-at-Arms 229 Author: Kevin Conley Ruffner Illustrator: Ronald Volstad About this book Hermann Göring raised the Luftwaffe Field Divisions [LwFD] during 1942, when Nazi Germany was still making spectacular gains but was first feeling the pinch of its losses on the Eastern Front. The Reichsmarschall decided to raise his own divisions for ground service under the command of Luftwaffe officers. On 17 September 1942, Göring called for volunteers from throughout the Luftwaffe for combat duty in the East. Even before that date, however, some Luftwaffe troops were heavily engaged against the enemy in Russia in a ground role. Kevin Conley Ruffner's engaging text tells the fascinating story of the LwFD.
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Men-at-Arms 213 Author: Gordon Williamson Illustrator: Ronald Volstad About this book The military policeman must be one of the least appreciated yet most indispensable military figures in modern history. In the mobile warfare of the 20th century no army could keep its vital supply routes open without the military policeman. This book documents the organisation, uniforms and insignia of the many and varied German military police units of World War II. Their duties included traffic control; maintaining military order and discipline; collection and escorting prisoners of war; prevention of looting; disarming civilians; checking captured enemy soldiers for documents; collection of fallen enemy propaganda leaflets and providing street patrols in occupied areas.
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Men-at-Arms 147 Author: Carlos Caballero Jurado Illustrator: Kevin Lyles About this book When speaking of the units of foreign volunteers integrated into the German forces during World War II, the Waffen-SS automatically comes to mind. But, in absolute numbers, more foreigners served with the Wehrmacht in the army, navy and air force. Anti-Communism was the most significant reason why so many volunteers were induced to wear the German uniform. This title examines the Wehrmacht’s foreign volunteers, taking a close look at their uniforms, organisation and distinctive insignia. Among those covered are the Legion Wallanie, LVF, Ostlegionen, Balkan volunteers, Hiwis, Kalmucks, Cossacks, Baltic, Russian and Ukranian volunteers.
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Men-at-Arms 139 Author: Bruce Quarrie Illustrator: Mike Chappell About this book Airborne operations have often been called a vertical envelopment, and therein lies one of the best descriptions of their value. The essence of an envelopment is to pin the enemy in place so that it can be destroyed. A strong enemy force to one's rear disrupts supplies and communications and makes one more vulnerable to an attack from the front. It also has a major psychological impact. To an aggressor the value of airborne troops, used properly, far outweighs their numerical strength. Bruce Quarrie's engaging text tells the story of the German airborne troops of the Second World War.
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Men-at-Arms 34 Author: Martin Windrow Illustrator: Jeffrey Burn About this book In the early 1920s, a tiny group was formed within the SA to serve as Hitler's personal bodyguard. Originally labelled the 'Stosstruppe Adolf Hitler', they later became known as the SS – Schutz Staffeln, or 'protection squads'. From these humble beginnings, the SS rose to a nominal strength of 38 divisions of over 800,000 men by 1945, representing a sizeable portion of Germany's land forces and more importantly a quarter of her tank forces and a third of her mechanised infantry. Martin Windrow provides a splendid in-depth review of the history, uniforms and insignia of the infamous Waffen-SS.
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Men-at-Arms 24 Illustrator: Richard Hook About this book For the first three years of the Second World War the German Army's armoured formations dominated the world's battlefields. During this period the Panzerwaffe swept away all that was before them, achieving victories over numerically superior and sometimes better equipped opponents. This remarkable book by Martin Windrow deals with one of the German Army's most effective and feared rapid attack forces, including a summary of every Panzer division's war record and an extensive examination of uniforms, equipment and decorations.
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Men-at-Arms 124 Author: Anthony Kemp Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book This fascinating study by Anthony Kemp outlines the careers and characters of a number of senior German commanders. To those who read military history many of the names are familiar. It is a paradox, however, that few biographies have been written. The impression still exists today of German generals as stiff-necked, scar-faced, monocled Prussians. Whilst in a few cases this was certainly true, the fact remains that all of them were men, some more ordinary than others. With a variety of photographs, eight full-page colour plates by Angus McBride, accompanied by ten pages of commentaries, this is a first-class addition to Osprey's Men-at-Arms series.
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Men-at-Arms 103 Author: John Scurr Illustrator: Richard Hook About this book The Spanish Civil War had been a conflict between the nationalists and conservatives on one side, and what they saw as the opposing anarchic atheistic Marxism which was eroding the traditional Catholic values of Spain. The nationalists eventually won with the aid of Germany against the Soviet backed Marxists, and four years later, the Spaniards seized the opportunity to settle a score with those who had attempted to disintegrate their country. John Scurr's book provides an absorbing account of the organisation, campaigns and uniforms of Germany's Spanish volunteers who fought from 1941-45.
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Men-at-Arms 53 Author: Martin Windrow Illustrator: Michael Roffe About this book The desert war produced commanders of dash and originality on both sides and the memory of the German commanding general, Erwin Rommel, has endured as the epitome of skill, daring and soldierly integrity. His victories were brilliant until he was bested by poor health, lack of reinforcements and an opposing commander who was his equal. The contribution of his various troops is detailed in a full order of battle which includes his veteran Afrika Korps and Italian allies, and their uniforms are shown in full colour arwork.
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