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Title: Munda 45 B. C. The last Caesar's battle Author: José Ignacio Lago Marín Pages: 112 Cover: paperback Language: spanish
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Title: Trajan: Сampaigns of One Hispanic Emperor Author: José Ignacio Lago Marín Pages: 104 Cover: paperback Language: spanish
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Title: Cartago Nova 209 B. C. The First victory of Scipio in Hispania Author: José Ignacio Lago Marín Pages: 95 Cover: paperback Language: spanish
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Title: Baecula and Ilipa 208-206 B. C. Scipio conquers Hispania Author: José Ignacio Lago Marín Pages: 105 Cover: paperback Language: spanish
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Title: Hispanic resistence aganist Rome Author: Julio Rodríguez González Pages: 351 Cover: paperback Language: spanish
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Title: Author: Julio Rodríguez González Pages: 140 Cover: paperback Language: spanish
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Title: Author: Julio Rodríguez González Pages: 140 Cover: paperback Language: spanish
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Title: Author: Julio Rodríguez González Pages: 140 Cover: paperback Language: spanish
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Title: Praetorians: the imperial guard of Ancient Rome Author: Adolfo Raul Menéndez Arguín Pages: 245 Cover: paperback Language: spanish
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Warrior 162 Author: Nic Fields Illustrator: Seán Ó’Brógáin About this book Soon after the Caudine Forks fiasco in 321 BC, the tactical formation adopted by the Roman Army underwent a radical change. Introduced as part of the Servian reforms, the legion had originally operated as a Greek-style phalanx. Now, however, the Romans adopted the manipular system, whereby the legion was split into distinct battle lines, each consisting of tactical subunits, the maniples. Even though still a citizen militia, recruited from property owners supplying their own war gear, it was the manipular legion that faced Pyrrhus and his elephants, the Gauls and their long swords, Hannibal and his tactical genius and the Macedonians and their pikes to name but a few of its formidable opponents. This book looks at the recruitment, training, weapons, equipment and experiences of the legionary at the epoch of the middle Republic, which opens with the last great war with the Samnites (Third Samnite War, 298–290 BC) and closes with the Republic at the height of its imperial glory after the victory in North Africa (Iugurthine War 112–105 BC).
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Men-at-Arms 479 Author: Raffaele D’Amato Illustrator: Giuseppe Rava About this book In the years between 31 BC and AD 500 the Romans carved out a mighty empire stretching from Britain to the deserts of North Africa. The men who spearheaded this expansion were the centurions, the tough, professional warriors who led from the front, exerted savage discipline and provided a role model for the legionaries under their command. This book, the second volume of a two-part study, reveals the appearance, weaponry, role and impact of these legendary soldiers during the five centuries that saw the Roman Empire reach its greatest geographical extent under Trajan and Hadrian, only to experience a long decline in the West in the face of sustained pressure from its ‘barbarian’ neighbours. Featuring spectacular full-colour artwork, written by an authority on the army of the Caesars and informed by a wide range of sculptural, written and pictorial evidence from right across the Roman world, this book overturns established wisdom and sheds new light on Rome’s most famous soldiers during the best-known era in its history.
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General Military Author: Chris McNab About this book The image of the Roman legionary is as familiar today as it was to the citizens – and enemies – of the vast Roman Empire two thousand years ago. This book goes beyond the stereotypes found in popular culture to examine the Roman Army from the first armed citizens of the early Republic through the glorious heights of the Imperial legions to the shameful defeats inflicted upon the late Roman Army by the Goths and Huns. Tracing the development of tactics, equipment and training, this work provides a detailed insight into the military force that enable Rome to become the greatest empire the world has ever seen. As well as describing the changes in the army over the centuries, The Roman Army also sheds light on the talented men who led these soldiers in battle and the momentous battles fought, including Cannae, Pharsalus and Adrianople. Illustrated with detailed maps, artwork and photographs, this volume provides a complete reference to the Roman Army from the 8th century BC to the period after the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD.
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Battle Orders 34 Author: Nic Fields About this book The Roman Legions were the most highly organized troops of the ancient world, but the process of turning the Legions into the professional force that built an empire, was no small feat. Focusing on the organisational changes in the Roman Army during the Civil Wars, Nic Fields examines the role played by Caius Marius and his far-reaching reforms. With the nuts and bolts detail that readers demand from the Battle Orders series, this is an intriguing description of how the Roman army grew, modernised, rebelled and finally helped build an empire, complete with full organisational charts, photographs and detailed maps.
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Men-at-Arms 390 Illustrator: Graham Sumner About this book The armour and weapons of the Roman army have long been the subject of intense research and speculation. While much has been published on their arms and armour, however, the actual clothing of Imperial soldiers has largely been overlooked. In this second part of a rigorous study of the literary, sculptural, pictorial and archaeological evidence, the specialist author-artist examines the clues which enable us to attempt reconstructions of items worn by officers and men all over the empire during the two centuries between the reign of Septimius Severus and the twilight years of Stilicho.
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Battle Orders 27 Author: Nic Fields About this book As Rome’s power and influence extended across the Mediterranean, she was destined for a collision with the Carthaginian Empire, a clash ultimately resulting in the decisive Second Punic War. At first the Roman Army was no match for the superior tactics and leadership of Hannibal and his troops. However, talented generals like Scipio Africanus transformed the legions into a formidable fighting force. Covering Rome’s catastrophic defeats at Lake Trasimene and Cannae to her final victory at Zama, this book examines the development of Roman tactics and organization through Rome’s transition from a city-based state to a Mediterranean powerhouse.
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Men-at-Arms 93 Author: Michael Simkins Illustrator: Ronald Embleton About this book The year AD 122 was the first time a Roman Emperor had set foot in the Province of Britannia since the invasion in AD 43. No doubt he had read many reports concerning the damage caused by marauding tribesmen crossing from what is now Scotland into the Province. Hadrian, therefore, decided - in the words of his biographer - 'to build a wall to separate the Romans from the Barbarians'. This engaging work from author Michael Simkins explores in depth the organisation, equipment, weapons and armour of the Roman Army from Hadrian to Constantine, one of the most exciting periods in Roman history.
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Elite 172 Author: Nic Fields Illustrators: Gerry Embleton Sam Embleton About this book By 390 BC, the Roman army was in need of change, as Greek-style tactics of fighting with a heavy infantry phalanx were proving increasingly outdated. A military revolution was born in the form of the legion, a tool of war better suited to aggressive action. Yet by the end of the 3rd century BC, Rome’s prestige was shattered by the genius of Hannibal of Carthage, causing the Romans to revise their battle tactics once more, this time by inventing a whole new kind of soldier. This book reveals these two defining moments in Roman military history and the revolution in battle tactics that they caused, examining how the Roman army eventually became all-conquering and all-powerful.
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Men-at-Arms 46 Author: Michael Simkins Illustrator: Ronald Embleton About this book Although the common Roman fighting men themselves have left no account, much literature has survived from antiquity. The wealth of archaeological finds, plus the study of surviving Roman scultpure has allowed hisorians to learn much about the nature of the Roman army which conquered an astonishing expanse of territory. Michael Simkins brings all his substantial knowledge to bear on this fascinating subject, covering such topics as army composition, recruitment, training, campaign routine and providing a wealth of detail on weapons, uniforms and equipment. Men-at-Arms 283, 291 and 46 are also available in a single volume special edition as ‘Caesar’s Legions’.
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Elite 155 Author: Ross Cowan Illustrator: Adam Hook About this book How, exactly, did Rome become master of the ancient world? This book examines and illustrates the tactics employed by the legions of late Republican and early Imperial Rome, from the evidence o f ancient writers. The greatest military machine in the Western world for at least four centuries, the Roman Army was the foundation of the Western military tradition, and its doctrines were central to the later revival of trained, drilled professional armies. Here the evidence is discussed in clear detail, and brought to life with battle plans and full colour interpretations of tactical scenarios
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Men-at-Arms 425 Author: Raffaele D’Amato Illustrator: Graham Sumner About this book This book is the concluding part of a rigorous study of theliterary, sculptural, pictorial and archaeological evidence for Roman military clothing, covering the last days of the Western Empire, and the much longer record of the Eastern, in the 5th to 7th centuries. The evidence from this enormously colourful period – when Germanic and Persian styles, first introduced by mercenaries, were widely adopted by Roman armies – is particularly rich. The text is illustrated with many photographs of rare textile finds, and mosaic artwork; with careful drawings of other figurative sources; and with Graham Sumner’s meticulous and dazzling colour reconstructions.
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Elite 50 Author: Boris Rankov Illustrator: Richard Hook About this book The Praetorian Guard of Imperial Rome was the power behind the throne, with the ability to make or break an emperor. As the main body of troops in Rome, they were the emperor's instrument to discourage plotting and rebellion and to crush unrest. The emperor's most immediate line of defence, they could also be his most deadly enemies. This book details the organization, dress and history of the Praetorian Guard from the time of the late Republic to the Guard's effective destruction at the battle of Milvian Bridge in AD 312. Numerous illustrations vividly depict the uniforms and weaponry of this elite fighting unit.
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Battle Orders 37 Author: Nic Fields About this book The Imperial Army established by Augustus drew heavily on the nomenclature and traditions of the late Roman Republic, but was revolutionary in its design. He decided to meet all the military needs of the Empire from a standing, professional army. Military service became a career: enlistment was for 25 years (16 in the Praetorian Guard), and men were sometimes retained even longer. The loyalty of the new army was to the emperor and not to either the Senate or the People of Rome. Imperial legions became permanent units with their own numbers and titles and many were to remain in existence for centuries to come.
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Men-at-Arms 291 Author: Nicholas Sekunda Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book The principal source of information on the Roman Republican Army is the sixth book of the Histories of the Greek historian Polybius, written a little before 150BC. This engaging text by Nicholas Sekunda draws heavily on this vital source to outline the equipment and organisation of the Roman Republican Army from 200–104 BC – a time when Rome was growing from a regional to a world power. With plenty of photographs and illustrations, including eight vivid full page colour plates by Angus McBride, this fascinating volume examines such topics as the Roman shield, helmets, the cuirass, greaves, the pilum, legion organisation, the principales and the tactics they employed. Men-at-Arms 283, 291 and 46 are also available in a single volume special edition as ‘Caesar’s Legions’.
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Warrior 101 Author: Nic Fields Illustrator: Adam Hook About this book Drawn from a wide range of warlike peoples throughout the provinces, especially on the fringes of the empire, auxiliaries were generally not citizens of the Roman empire. The cavalry of the auxilia provided a powerful fighting arm; organized, disciplined and well trained, it was adept at performing both skirmish and shock action. This book details the many roles of the Roman auxiliary cavalryman, including reconnaissance, communication and policing duties, as well as in battle. Motivation for enlisting, conditions of service and experience of battle are all explored, and colour illustrations support the text.
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Men-at-Arms 374 Illustrator: Graham Sumner About this book The armour and weapons of Rome's legionaries and auxiliaries have been the subject of intense research and speculation, and much has been published - but almost nothing on the actual clothing of Imperial soldiers. In this first part of a rigorous study of the literary, sculptural, pictorial and archaeological evidence, a specialist author/artist examines the clues which enable us to attempt reconstructions of tunics, cloaks, footwear and other items worn by officers and men all over the empire, from the late Republic to c.200 AD. His text is illustrated with meticulous drawings of surviving relief sculptures - particularly soldiers' gravestones - and eight striking colour plates.
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