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Other ancient nations

Other ancient nations


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18.00
Warrior 150 Author: Nic Fields Illustrator: Steve Noon About this book By the outbreak of the First Carthaginian War, Carthage controlled the whole coast of northern Africa. At first, the core of the Carthaginian armies was made up of armed citizens, backed by levies from tributary allies and foreign mercenaries. Later, the mercenaries would become the backbone of these armies. This book explores the heterogeneous mixture of races within the Carthaginian forces, and discusses their clothing, equipment and weaponry. It details their tactical deployment and covers the campaign experiences of the great general Hannibal, who inflicted a number of defeats on Rome, before his eventual defeat at the battle of Zama in 202 BC.
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Men-at-Arms 109 Author: Terence Wise Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book This text by Terence Wise explores some of the fascinating peoples who comprised the ancient armies of the Middle East: the Sumerians, who were the first to introduce the use of bronze into warfare, and were centuries ahead of the Egyptians in the use of the wheel – The Akkadians, whose citizen army was composed almost entirely of light troops – The Babylonians, whose people were granted land in return for army service – the horned warriors of the Elamites – the Egyptians, with thier heavy spearmen and archers – the tribal and warlike Libyans – Nubians and Ethiopians – Hyksos – the armies of the Hittite Empire – the Sea People and others.
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Men-at-Arms 360 Author: Christopher Webber Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book Throughout the three centuries before Christ many hundreds of thousands of Thracians, in more than 40 tribes, occupied the area between northern Greece, southern Russia and north-west Turkey. Skilled horsemen, masters of light infantry fighting in broken terrain, and renowned for their ferocity, the Thracians were feared by even the greatest of their contemporaries, who were eager to employ them as mercenaries. After surviving invasions by the Persians, Greeks, Macedonians and Celts, the Thracians were finally conquered by Rome in AD 46. This concise but lavishly illustrated study of their history and material culture includes the results of the latest archaeological research, notably some remarkable tomb paintings.
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Warrior 30 Author: Stephen Allen Illustrator: Wayne Reynolds About this book In the 1st century BC, Strabo wrote of the Celts: ‘The whole race... is madly fond of war, high-spirited and quick to battle... and on whatever pretext you stir them up, you will have them ready to face danger, even if they have nothing on their side but their own strength and courage’. This book gives an insight into the life of the Celtic warrior, and his experience of battle – on foot, on horseback, and as a charioteer. It also details Celtic society and studies the vital ritual nature of Celtic warfare, from the naked gaesatae to the woad-painted warriors.
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Warrior 17 Author: Simon MacDowall Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book The 3rd to the 6th centuries saw the collapse of the classical Mediterranean civilization and the emergence of new states in western Europe based on the Germanic warrior society. This book focuses particularly on the men who made up the retinues of the Germanic warlords who carved kingdoms out of the carcass of the West Roman Empire. Although sources are scarce, Simon MacDowall constructs a convincing picture, using evidence from Roman historians, German archaeology and Anglo-Saxon poetry. The warriors' society, hierarchy, training, equipment, appearance, tactics and style of fighting are all examined, building a comprehensive portrait of the Germanic warrior in this period.
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Warrior 120 Author: Trevor Bryce Illustrator: Adam Hook About this book Contents Introduction · Chronology · The Hierarchy of Command · Enlistment · Clothing and Equipment · The Hittites on Campaign · Training and Discipline · Belief and Belonging · The Army in Battle · The Life and Duties of a Soldier · Sites, Museums and Electronic Resources · Bibliography · Colour plate commentary · Index
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Elite 120 Author: Antony Karasulas Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book For more than 2,000 years hordes of mounted nomadic archers from the vastness of the steppe and from Central Asia spewed out into China, the Middle East, and Europe. Feared and reviled, they were a formidable threat to the lands they invaded. Their influence on military history is incalculable: the whole foundation of late Classical and Medieval Western and Middle Eastern military thought was based on the reality of a highly mobile, tough and unconventional foe, one which could strike almost anywhere at will and with highly effective long-range weapons. This book details the history, weapons, equipment and tactics of these fascinating warriors.
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Elite 40 Author: Mark Healy Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book Builders of the Pyramids and most ancient of all the powers of the biblical world, the Egyptians remain one of history's most fascinating and enigmatic peoples. During the New Kingdom era, Egypt reached the peak of its power, wealth, and territory. Through the intensive military campaigns of Pharaoh Thutmose III (1490-1436BC), Palestine, Syria, and the northern Euphrates area in Mesopotamia were all brought within the New Kingdom. Mark Healy outlines the history, organisation and dress of the New Kingdom Egyptians in this volume packed with accompanying illustrations and photographs, including 12 full page colour plates by the ever popular Angus McBride.
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Men-at-Arms 247 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book Although the Byzantine Empire was a continuation of the Roman Empire and faced similar military problems, its solutions were very different. In North Africa, for example, Rome's large army concentrated on securing main roads and urban centres. Byzantium's smaller army built more fortifications and took a defensive stance. The most striking characteristic of later Byzantine military thinking was, however, the theme or provincial army system, which owed nothing to ancient Roman tradition. With eight superb full colour plates by Angus McBride, and many other illustrations, David Nicolle examines the history of Romano-Byzantine armies from 4th-9th centuries.
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Men-at-Arms 129 Author: Peter Wilcox Illustrator: Gerry Embleton About this book These vigorous northern 'barbarians' were the destroyers of the Western Empire of Rome. It was they who delivered the coup de grâce to the dying colossus in the south, subsequently creating medieval Europe, the feudal system and chivalry. Their direct descendants were the knights and men-at-arms. In every sense, they were the creators of the modern world; it is ironic that many people know virtually nothing about them. This book explores the history, weapons and dress of the Germanics and Dacians who fought Rome two thousand years before our time.
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Men-at-Arms 158 Author: Peter Wilcox Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book In 390 BC a Gallic army marched on Rome. A confident Roman army of about 15,000 men sent to bar the way was destroyed. Three days after the battle the Gauls entered Rome, much of which they burnt, and demanded a huge bounty of gold to leave the city. During the weighing procedure, Brennus, the Gallic leader, is said to have thrown his sword on to the scales with the words 'Vae victis' - 'Woe to the defeated'. A sentiment the Gauls were soon to experience first hand. This fascinating work by Peter Wilcox explores the history, dress and equipment of Rome's Celtic enemies.
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Men-at-Arms 175 Author: Peter Wilcox Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book The Parthians were a warrior people. Though possessing no regular army they were superb horsemen and archers, and in time of war the nobility provided heavily armoured knights mounted on weight-carrying chargers. At Carrhae, it is believed that 20,000 Roman troops out of a force of about 36,000 died at the hands of the Parthians. In the third of four volumes covering Rome's enemies, this fascinating text by Peter Wilcox examines the armies and campaigns of the Parthians and Sassanid Persians. This worthy addition to Osprey's Men-at-Arms series contains a wealth of illustrations, including eight full page colour plates by popular artist Angus McBride.
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Men-at-Arms 180 Author: Rafael Treviño Martinez Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book The Republican Roman army suffered heavy losses as a result of the ‘hit and run’ tactics employed by the Hispanics in Ancient Spain. After preparatory chanting, the Celt-Iberians would attack en masse and in apparent disorder. At a pre-arranged signal the warriors would retreat as if defeated. This sequence might be repeated over several days, until finally the Romans lost their discipline and broke formation in pursuit. At this point the Hispanics would quickly mount a counter-attack that would decimate the legions. This volume explores the organisation, tactics, history, arms and armour of Rome's Spanish enemies.
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Men-at-Arms 243 Author: David Nicolle Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book Rome's desert frontier was one where the Empire faced few dangers, for here relations were generally based on a mutual interest in trade across the frontier. Yet when Rome did clash with desert peoples, particularly those of Syria and Arabia, the mobility, fighting skills and ability to withdraw into an arid wilderness often gave the Arabs, Berbers and Sudanese an extra edge. This fascinating volume by David Nicolle explores the history and armies of Rome's enemies of the desert frontier. The author's fine text is accompanied by a wealth of illustrations and photographs, including eight stunning full page colour plates by Angus McBride.
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Elite 110 Author: Kaveh Farrokh Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book The Sassanians ruled the last great imperial Empire of Persia before the Arab conquests of the 7th century. Rome’s only equal in the classical world, the Sassanian Empire had an enormous impact on the development of architecture, mythology, arts, music, military tactics and technology. Within the Sassanian military, the cavalry was the most influential element, and Sassanian cavalry tactics were adopted by the Romans, Arabs, and Turks. Their cavalry systems of weaponry, battle tactics, Tamgas, Medallions, court customs, and costumes influenced Romano-Byzantine and medieval European culture, and this book allows the reader to see how a little-studied eastern power affected the development of cavalry traditions in the western world.
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Warrior 121 Author: Nic Fields Illustrator: Peter Bull About this book Mythical in their own time, the power and status of the Pharaohs of Egypt have remained so through the millennia. In this book, Nic Fields explores the lives of the ordinary soldiers who sustained Middle Kingdom Egypt. Using rare artefacts he reconstructs the day-to-day existence of the Pharaoh's army from archers to hand-to-hand fighters, through to the 'sole-companions' of the Pharaoh. Quoting from ancient sources he narrates sea and land battles in dramatic detail, all the while providing the reader with a rare insight into the minutiae of the soldier's life, from the food he ate to the gods he worshipped.
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Warrior 111 Author: Nic Fields Illustrator: Christa Hook About this book The Huns were the most feared barbarians of the Ancient world, known to their Roman enemies as the 'scourge of god'. Superb horsemen and excellent archers, they fought with a reflex composite-bow that could penetrate armour at 100 metres. In battle they would rush into the fray with surprising speed and apparent chaos, maintaining an incessant barrage until the enemy was sufficiently weakened; thus their very name came to epitomise swift, merciless destruction. This book explores the rise of the Huns and their development in terms of equipment, tactics and society, from their first attacks on the Goths to the death of the Emperor Justinian, including the great battle of Chalons and the reign of Attila.
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Elite 39 Author: Mark Healy Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book For the greater part of the period from the end of the 10th century to the 7th century BC, the Ancient Near East was dominated by the dynamic military power of Assyria. At the zenith of its rule Assyria could lay claim to an empire that stretched from Egypt in the west to the borders of Iran in the east and encompassed for the first time in history, within the realm of a single imperial domain, the whole of the 'Fertile Crescent'. Mark Healy, covers the history of the Assyrians from their ancient beginnings to the eventual fall of the city of Nineveh.
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Elite 42 Author: Nicholas Sekunda Illustrator: Simon Chew About this book The Persian Empire grew in the vacuum left by Assyria's destruction of the Kingdom of Elam. Prince Teispes captured Anshan, once a stonghold of the Elamites. His father, Achaemenes is the person who is apparently responsible for training and organising the early Persian army and it is his name that is the beginning of the royal line of Achaemenian Kings. It is a dynasty which includes Darius the Great – the finest ruler of the Achaemenid era. The army he commanded included the infamous 'Immortals', who formed the elite of the Persian army, their numbers always kept to exactly 10,000 men.
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Men-at-Arms 373 Author: Richard Brzezinski Illustrator: Gerry Embleton About this book The Sarmatians - one of the many nomadic groups to emerge from the great Eurasian Steppe - crossed the Don in about the 3rd century BC to displace their western neighbours, the Scythians, in the lands north of the Black Sea. Later they burst into Asia Minor and Rome's Danube provinces, becoming famous for the prowess of their lance-armed cavalry - first as enemies, and later as allies of Rome. They influenced Rome's adoption of heavy armoured cavalry, and in Roman service they were even posted to Britain. Drawing upon a wide reading of Classical authors and of Russian archaeological publications, this fascinating study is the first major English language attempt to reconstruct their armour, equipment and tactics.
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Men-at-Arms 137 Author: E.V. Cernenko Illustrator: Angus McBride About this book Though the 'Scythian period' in the history of Eastern Europe lasted little more than 400 years, the impression these horsemen made upon the history of their times was such that a thousand years after they had ceased to exist as a sovereign people, their heartland and the territories which they dominated far beyond it continued to be known as 'greater Scythia'. From the very beginnings of their emergence on the world scene the Scythians took part in the greatest campaigns of their times, defeating such mighty contemporaries as Assyria, Urartu, Babylonia, Media and Persia. This highly illustrated book details their costume, weapons and the way they waged war.
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